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View Full Version : Any ideas on how to cut wine corks in half.



snafu
April 3rd, 2012, 10:33 AM
I have a project coming up that may need a bunch (possibly 100's) of wine corks cut in half.
Any ideas on how i could do this?



Thanks!!



http://www.thegallery.us/temp/homey.gif (http://www.thegallery.us)

David N Waldmann
April 3rd, 2012, 10:45 AM
http://thegrumble.com/showthread.php?40062-Wine-cork-bulletin-board
http://www.winepress.us/forums/index.php?/topic/49886-corkboard-i-made/

Rob Markoff
April 3rd, 2012, 10:55 AM
Cut in half crosswise or longwise? Do they have to be "exactly" in half lengthwise? That is a bit of a problem as every cork is slightly different in diameter. If you make your jig too tight, the blade binds as it goes through. If it is too loose, the cork can rotate in the jig or worse yet go flying out. The best solution is to have two toggle holdown clamps that grip either side of the cork and will allow the blade to pass through without putting pressure on the blade as the cut is made.

To cut crosswise, I have a jig for my radial arm saw that holds the cork so the pieces won't go flying after the cut is made (and it keeps fingers away from the blade.)

To cut lengthwise, I use a "sled" for my table saw that holds the cork and the sled slides on the saw so the cork does not have to be pushed through the blade. I use a "thin rim" or "narrow kerf" blade (Tenryu) so there is less material removed. I imagine a sled could also be made for a radial saw, but because the saw motor passes over the top of one side of the material, the height becomes a factor.

A band saw will work well but I am wary of getting my fingers so close to the blade- and I don't own one....yet.

I was not happy with the "look" and effort to cut the corks, so now i just glue them full size and make moulding that surrounds them so they sit flush to the top of the bulletin boards I make.

There is a company called, Micro Mark that sells miniature tools like those used by model makers. They have a small saw with very thin blades that would work well, though it is kind of spendy. http://www.micromark.com/microlux-mini-tilt-arbor-table-saw-for-benchtop-hobby-use,7500.html

Pat Murphey
April 3rd, 2012, 11:02 AM
I'd skip the Micromark. I've used their tools for model ship building - they do a credible job for such projects - but the belt driven saw will bind and slip in a cork.

wpfay
April 3rd, 2012, 11:40 AM
Band saw is the way to go. Sliding jig with a split piece of thin pvc pipe and a wooden plug. Pvc pipe acts as clamp, blade runs into plug so it is buried in wood while you remove the 2 halves of the cork. Thin kerf, little waste.
I freehanded about 500 corks through a band saw once. Jig has much more appeal.

Rick Granick
April 3rd, 2012, 11:48 AM
I was going to suggest a bandsaw with two blocks of wood to hold the cork, but I like Wally's idea better.
It's amazing how many uses there are for even a nice little Delta benchtop bandsaw in the frame shop.

:cool: Rick

Baer Charlton
April 3rd, 2012, 12:14 PM
I have always just super glued a piece of 3/4" pvc about 6" long to a board
I can clamp to the bandsaw.

Glued a couple of rails to guide the cut halfs to the end -- to drop into a box.

pass board and about 1" of the PVC pipe into the blade that is in the center
of the pipe. Turn off the saw and clamp the board in place.
Turn on the saw and feed the corks through the pipe -- the 1/2" wide
6-tooth skip blade is fast, smooth and will keep the cork straight.
you can feed about 200 corks through in about 20 minutes with five of that
being set up time.

Rob.... get the band saw.... Used properly it is the safest of all saws
other than hand saws.

Rob Markoff
April 3rd, 2012, 02:23 PM
Rob.... get the band saw....

I'm on it. I'll tell Barbara you said I HAVE to get one. :)

Actually, next job that calls for one will pull the trigger. Always wanted a huge Oliver Brothers one with a GIANT throat.

David N Waldmann
April 3rd, 2012, 02:27 PM
Always wanted a huge Oliver Brothers one with a GIANT throat.

I know you just went on a trip to wine country, how big a bottle did you buy?!!!

snafu
April 3rd, 2012, 02:45 PM
This is what I am about to do with the corks.


http://www.thegallery.us/temp/arvid2.jpg


http://www.thegallery.us/temp/homey.gif (http://www.thegallery.us)

pwalters
April 3rd, 2012, 02:50 PM
This is what I am about to do with the corks.


http://www.thegallery.us/temp/arvid2.jpg


http://www.thegallery.us/temp/homey.gif (http://www.thegallery.us)

Nice design. Why do you need to cut them?

Bob Doyle
April 3rd, 2012, 02:51 PM
I was gonna suggest that you use whole corks, not cut in half. You get to drink twice as much wine that way :)

Are you gonna set them in epoxy?

Rob Markoff
April 3rd, 2012, 02:52 PM
Great idea- but for uniformity I have found that two widths of a cork do not always equal one length - and depending on the style of the wine, not all cork lengths are the same either. I usually cut the lengths so that there is not the black "void" that is in the top of your photo.

snafu
April 3rd, 2012, 03:07 PM
Great idea- but for uniformity I have found that two widths of a cork do not always equal one length - and depending on the style of the wine, not all cork lengths are the same either. I usually cut the lengths so that there is not the black "void" that is in the top of your photo.

Yes the lengths will have to be trimmed down a little.

I have a feeling it will take a lot longer than expected.




I was gonna suggest that you use whole corks, not cut in half. You get to drink twice as much wine that way :)

Are you gonna set them in epoxy?

Epoxy? I was thinking silicon or hot glue.

http://www.thegallery.us/temp/homey.gif (http://www.thegallery.us)

pwalters
April 3rd, 2012, 03:12 PM
I have used Wine Enthusiast in the past and have found that the great majority of the corks they sell are consistent in size.

Wine Enthusiast Corks (http://www.wineenthusiast.com/recycled-premium-corks-(set-of-50).asp)

Rick Granick
April 3rd, 2012, 03:29 PM
Rob.... get the band saw.... Used properly it is the safest of all saws other than hand saws.

That's one of the reasons I like bandsaws. I have often thought of getting at least a small table saw, but I chicken out every time. Yes, I have used table saws, and I'm aware of all the safety procedures, jigs, etc. I still find it an intimidating piece of equipment.
:kaffeetrinker_2: Rick

osgood
April 3rd, 2012, 03:41 PM
I agree that a bandsaw is a great way to cut corks and is very safe. I had a 3ft bandsaw years ago and often cut and trimmed tiny pieces of wood held in my fingers without cutting myself. Circular saw...now that's different....bit me twice!

Trimming them to a consistent length would easily be done with a disc sander. A thick plywood jig with a square bottomed 'U' shape cut in it exactly the length you wish the corks to be, could hold the corks as you push the jig into the sander until the plywood barely touches.

Rob Markoff
April 3rd, 2012, 04:03 PM
Ormond- have you every sanded cork? I have not had good results as it is very "spongy" - maybe I was using too fine of a grit?

osgood
April 3rd, 2012, 07:16 PM
Rob,
I have only sanded it once that I can remember. It was on a disc sander, hand held, fairly coarse grit around 80. Very light touch, moving sideways across the disc.

Luddite
April 3rd, 2012, 11:29 PM
Exact razor saw, you can get one at a hobby shop....Labor intensive but effective. Put the cork in a vise or something to hold it. L

snafu
April 4th, 2012, 07:23 AM
Nice design. Why do you need to cut them?


http://www.thegallery.us/temp/arvid2.jpg


They are just two thick if I don't cut in half.
The corks in the image above are cut in half.


http://www.thegallery.us/temp/homey.gif (http://www.thegallery.us)

Baer Charlton
April 5th, 2012, 01:22 AM
I'm on it. I'll tell Barbara you said I HAVE to get one. :)

Actually, next job that calls for one will pull the trigger. Always wanted a huge Oliver Brothers one with a GIANT throat.


Meh..... Biggest Oliver I ever saw was only 26"..... But in the 1900s, American had a Camel-backed tricycle that had a 46" throat
with a 25" under the foot clearance. The bed was 70"long and 60" wide. The largest monster blade was 1/2"... most used was 1/8"...
it was a pattern-makers bandsaw.

And do NOT get a Laguna....

Get a Jet 14", "Plate" the base and stick a 6" riser on it. Use link belt for the drive.

I like the Delta only because it had the tension release... but I think Jet
and all of the knock-offs had them now. Also steer clear of Grizzly....

They are worse than Laguna.

And yes, I do know where I speak from. We were fletching 5/32 veneer out
of 4x4 white oak. I was using a 12" Delta with a 1/2hp motor. 1/2" 3-skip tooth
blades. The boss thought bigger and newer was better. 16", 220v 1hp with a 4-tooth
hook 1" blade. I was finished with 7 fletches faster than his 5 . . . Laguna came out
to reset up what I had pains-takingly aligned over a half day.... so just before
we finished for the day.... with his new Carter guides and all.... I popped of 7
with a old blade, and he was half way through his cut to get 4th and he wasn't
going to get a successful 5th.

It was in the back of his truck 40 minutes later. I haven't seen any improvements
in the last 18 years either.....

Let me know when you find that Oliver. :D

snafu
April 8th, 2012, 07:54 PM
The finished frame.

We went with a different moulding so I was able to use the whole cork without cutting them in half.

http://www.thegallery.us/temp/arvidcorks.jpg

http://www.thegallery.us/temp/homey.gif (http://www.thegallery.us)

osgood
April 8th, 2012, 08:58 PM
There's certainly some good harmony going on there, but I find my eyes only want to look at the corks in the frame!

Baer Charlton
April 8th, 2012, 09:38 PM
apply a darkening glaze over the corks - - before we are blinded
by the lightness. Seriously.

http://www.thegallery.us/temp/arvidcorks.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v337/BaerMPF/arvidcorks.jpg

Riverwood
April 8th, 2012, 11:46 PM
Hmmm Shafer Hillside....nice!

Pat Murphey
April 9th, 2012, 10:24 AM
I like them raw, that's the way they are in real life, and the art is bold enough to take it. :p

Great, fun design!!! (Dark is too much contrast with the white background.)

Rick Granick
April 9th, 2012, 11:49 AM
I agree with Pat. I like the corks natural. Nice combination of moulding and corks together for that. The only thing I would change is the proportion a bit: I try to avoid having the frame width and border (usually a mat) width be too close to the same.
:cool: Rick

P.S. How are the corks held in place?

wpfay
April 9th, 2012, 12:34 PM
With space limitations, I opted for the 10" benchtop Rikon band saw. Picked it up for $229.00 at Woodcraft during their hoilday sale. Bought 3 $75.00 gift cards to pay for it and got 3 nice folding knives to boot. More favorable reviews than Jet and less expensive than Powermatic (Both made in the same factory in China now). I figured most of what I was going to be doing with this is detail work so it made no sense to get a stationary saw. Comes in real handy making custom mounts.

I have worked on a big band saw. Dated from the 1800's and was originally in a shipswright's shop. It was all cast iron with 36" wheels and a nightmare should OSHA have ever seen it. Used it to resaw some Brazilian Rosewood my folks picked up at Paxton Lumber in the 70's. I feel much safer with my little Rikon.

Baer Charlton
April 10th, 2012, 10:36 AM
Good move on that Riken, even better move on the gift cards.

Rick Granick
April 10th, 2012, 12:01 PM
That looks like a nice saw, at a nice price (even at $279 reg. price). My Delta benchtop saw just has a 7.5" cutting capacity, but it is adequate for most of the jobs I use it for. At home I have a 20 year old Craftsman benchtop with about a 10" capacity, but it's a 3-wheel design. It's actually a great saw. Its only drawback is no vacuum port, so it has to be cleaned out more often.
:cool: Rick

snafu
April 10th, 2012, 02:54 PM
P.S. How are the corks held in place?

I cut the inner frame to the size of the art, cut black foam core 4" larger than the outside of the inner frame this will give me a 2" border to glue the corks, cut a hole in the fc for the art to fit in, stapled the foam core to the back of the inner frame, glued corks to fc using clear silicon.
But later I found out that Liquid Nails worked just as good if not better.

http://www.thegallery.us/temp/homey.gif (http://www.thegallery.us)

echavez123
April 11th, 2012, 01:46 AM
Guess what my sister had buried in a pile of stuff in her garage --- a bandsaw! Now, I wonder if she might have some corks stored there too. Guess I will start collecting corks ...

PaulSF
April 11th, 2012, 01:57 AM
This table saw isn't cheap, but it's amazing. Watch the video. Then watch it again.

http://www.sawstop.com/how-it-works/?gclid=CJDsjbGOrK8CFcIFRQodDwSXqw



That's one of the reasons I like bandsaws. I have often thought of getting at least a small table saw, but I chicken out every time. Yes, I have used table saws, and I'm aware of all the safety procedures, jigs, etc. I still find it an intimidating piece of equipment.
:kaffeetrinker_2: Rick

Rick Granick
April 11th, 2012, 03:25 PM
Yes, that technology has been around for a few years now. Next they need to work on a solution for hurling workpieces.
:kaffeetrinker_2: Rick

osgood
April 11th, 2012, 04:15 PM
Yes, that technology has been around for a few years now. Next they need to work on a solution for hurling workpieces.
:kaffeetrinker_2: Rick
Rick,
Magswitch, a company from my town has just the solution for that. They are called 'Featherboards' and these ones have a switchable (not electronic) rare earth magnet that holds them in place on a sawbench and/or the fence. Obviously the machine needs to have steel fence and top.

My son used to work for the company and spent 2 1/2 years in Denver marketing Magswitch products. (http://www.magswitch.com.au/featherboards/featherboards.html)