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Articles on framing in non-framing magazines

Discussion in 'Picture Framing Business Issues' started by B. Newman, Oct 23, 2002.

  1. B. Newman

    B. Newman SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer

    Ok, now that Max and I have severely frankenthreaded Marc's thread with the homework assignment, I thought I'd better get out of there. But there were some good thoughts going before that.

    So, what kind of articles should one write for other magazines? My writing generally runs to business, marketing and customer service. That's not (I don't think) the kind of articles that need to be gotten "out there." I would think they need to be more design oriented, or education on conservation, etc. Is that your thoughts too?

    This is one reason I have not pursued this direction of writing. I simply am not as good as the rest of you in terms of technical knowledge. And since most of these magazines are very "visual", any framing article would need to be as well.

    What kind of articles do you think need to be written for "out there"?

    Betty
     
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  2. Barb Pelton

    Barb Pelton SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer

    Betty-
    I actually thought that this might be an avenue to explore a few months ago when someone was complaining about an article that was in a magazine that was illustrating "how-to-do-it-yourself" framing----with alot of misleading information. I thought well, why doesn't someone write an article about what to LOOK FOR in quality custom framing?
    OK, Betty! Lets just brainstorm a bit.
    Showcasing the Unique. Ideas about shadowboxes.
    Unique Techniques available from quality custom framers. I'm thinking something like showing off what the Average Person doesn't even know that is available. How many people outside of our industry and a few of our regular customers know that there's people out there that carve mats (ala Brian Wolf) I would think that would be a talent our industry should showcase!
    I would think something pointing out good design elements in framing would be very interesting! We definately need to focus on educating the consumer eye! Mat widths, proper use of color, etc. How to pick a good moulding. The difference in quality materials (glass, mats, etc) Most people accept or don't notice those acid burn lines on their artwork until we point them out.
    How about boosting a child's self esteem by showcasing their artwork? I'd think that would be a great article for parenting type magazines.
    Collectors magazines? Wow. Just think of the possibilities there!
    Well, I gotta get to work! I'll have this stewing in the back of my mind today and let you know what else.
     
  3. Jill

    Jill CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2

    Betty:

    As a reader of many other magazines what you would wright about would be determined by the publication first of all. A stitchery magizine would be a perfect forum for a stretching and mat carving artical. Either from a do it yourself standpoint or a what to look for or avoid angle.

    A good decorating mag cries out for a artical on what to or not to do from a design stand point. I am tired of the hot glue you memories to poster board kind of thing that seems to be in all the collectable mags, and crafting books.

    I am hoping someone with talent and framing experience will start dishing out good information to the general public,(our perspective clients)

    Thanks
    Jill Hennes CPF
    Omro Gallery
     
  4. ERIC

    ERIC SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer

    How about an article in a travel mag about what to look for and avoid when buying 'tourist art'!

    What is an original. What is a copy. What is a good copy. What is a bad copy.

    Make sure that the art you are about to buy is not also at twenty other street corners. (Just maybe the guy you are paying is not the artist.)

    How to carry your art. Yes, you should drop off your museum poster to FedEx and ship it home in perfect condition. (Then we won't have to explain why their poster has a little wrinkle in it every inch or so, all the way across!)

    If it is a canvas, make sure that it has a margin big enough to restretch. (Don't let the guy use a razor blade to remove the painting.)

    Then get them into one of our shops to have that little dity of theirs turned into the masterpiece they thought they were getting in the first place.
     
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