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belt dropped off after heat glue

kwikpictureframing

Grumbler in Training
hi there we framed this boxing belt and after a few months the belt dropped off? We used just hot glue sticks to stick the belt on? How can we hold it into place without if falling off and seeing any type of attachments? we cant show any type of wire or anything else? please advise

thanks

Suki
 

Attachments

888

munnframeworks

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
We use fishing monofiliment and put small holes behind the object we are mounting. we stitch it through the holes.
 

Lafontsee

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
We use fishing monofiliment and put small holes behind the object we are mounting. we stitch it through the holes.
You might also be able to stitch through the lines of existing stitches with matching colored thread.

Do the big medallions offer any points of attachment on the back side?

James
 

bruce papier

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
I second James' idea. You may want to get needles made for soft sculpture dolls (I call them autopsy needles). They are long and stout.

Wear comfortable clothes. It's going to take a while.
 

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
You are actually lucky that the glue did not stick to the belt, because you would have irreversably altered it, reducing its value. Mechanical attachments are always better than adhesives, because they are more reliable and less apt to negatively affect the condition of an item. Even though customers always think they want "invisible" means of mounting, that is often a practical impossibility. What they really want is an unobtrusive mounting method. Advise them to look at how objects are displayed in museums. The mounts are visible, yet they do not detract from seeing the object because they have been made as unobtrusive as possible. Stitching through the lines of existing stitches with matching colored thread, as James suggested, might be a good alternative, but you will probably need some other way of supporting the heavy central element.

:cool: Rick
 

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
I'd use a fine wire or heavy thread with multiple attachment points along the belt. I'm sure you can hook onto hardware holding the center part, where most of the weight is, and that's where you should start, proceeding to the outer points from the center. Make sure your backing offers good support.
 

cvm

PFG, Picture Framing God
I've seen these these signed Floyd Mayweather belts in a lot of places (Amazon sells 'em). I'm pretty sure most of the ones you see framed flat are affixed with some kind of adhesive. I'm not saying it's correct, but I believe that's what's usually going on - hence the customer's expectations. These belts are tough because there isn't anything on the back of the belt where the large center medallion is (no pass-through bolts, etc).

You could secure the left side with non-degrading monofilament through the loop where the buckle joins the belt and use a couple of brass Chicago screws through the holes on the right side and secure the center with 4 small bent rods at 10-2-4-8.
 

artfolio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Ditto to all of the above comments regarding mechanical fitting rather than glue - You just cannot trust adhesives for long term support of heavy objects. My thoughts on this job would be:

Fuse wire or fishing line looped around the tongue of the buckle and slid down to the base where the leather (?) would hide it.

Stitching with monofilament line through the full thickness of the belt under the medallions, depending on how these are attached you may be able to lift them away enough to hide your loops behind them. Failing this, if the belt is made up of two or more layers, use a curved needle to attach loops of wire or fishing line to the back layer and pass these through the backing. As a general rule I used to prefer fuse wire over fishing line because it is less likely to stretch or weaken over time.

Either way - you will need at least a couple of strong ties behind that central medallion and at least a couple more between the ends and the centre to avoid sagging over time.

My final suggestion is, after mounting anything, let it stand somewhere safe for at least a couple of days to give any problems a chance to reveal themselves before closing up the frame.
 

Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
The perfect response, in my opinion:
You are actually lucky that the glue did not stick to the belt, because you would have irreversably altered it, reducing its value. Mechanical attachments are always better than adhesives, because they are more reliable and less apt to negatively affect the condition of an item. Even though customers always think they want "invisible" means of mounting, that is often a practical impossibility. What they really want is an unobtrusive mounting method. Advise them to look at how objects are displayed in museums. The mounts are visible, yet they do not detract from seeing the object because they have been made as unobtrusive as possible. Stitching through the lines of existing stitches with matching colored thread, as James suggested, might be a good alternative, but you will probably need some other way of supporting the heavy central element.
:cool: Rick
My suggestion would be to use clear polyester film (Mylar-D) straps; four 1" straps equally spaced across the length of the belt (two on each side of the rounded center) would hold it securely and unobtrusively. The mounting would be completely reversible in the future and the belt's condition would be unchanged.
 

bruce papier

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
I hope one of these suggestions works for you, Suki. I feel your pain. We get people asking for what I call the Standard Anti-Gravity Mount quite frequently. It's hard to explain to them why heavy object can't be suspended as if by magic.
 

Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Hot glue really has no place in a frameshop..
The only time I would ever use it would be to hold, non value items in place, while adhesive is drying.
CB, I agree that hot glue - or nearly any other glue, for that matter - would be inappropriate for direct contact with customer's property. However, I have found hot-melt glue to be most useful for encapsulating formed-rod mounts in the air spaces between flutes of fluted polypropylene (aka Coroplast). Epoxy works for that, as well, but takes at least a little while to cure. Hot-melt glue makes the task of securing formed-rod mounts quick, easy, and secure.
 

framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
Hot glue really has no place in a frameshop..
The only time I would ever use it would be to hold, non value items in place, while adhesive is drying.
Nonsense!!!

EVERYTHING can have a place in a frameshop. It only depends on how you use it.

An example of how NOT to use it is the OP's use of it.

Many times, I have used it to make sure a thin frame around a poster stays in place because most people don't think to pick a frame up around the corners but almost always in the middle of the frame, bowing it out. A little splooch of hot glue stops it from moving.
 

freakquency

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
all I can say is DON'T USE ADHESIVES! Sew it on somehow!
 
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