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Framing Russian Icon

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Angela

Guest
A customer brought in a religious icon that has been in her family since the 1700's. It is a stunning piece, measuring approx. 5" x 7" with painted surfaces covered by a brass overlay. The "halo" around the Madonna and child are raised cloisonne surfaces (approx 3/4" above the flat surface). We chose a stacked frame and UV glass but I'm unsure of the best method to keep the glass off the piece.

If I line the rabbet of the frame with rag mat (like a shadowbox), how do I adhere the mat to the sides while still adhering to strict conservation standards? Any thoughts?

Thank you!
Angela
 
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JPete

<span style="color: red"><b><i>Charter Member</i><
Angela, Do a search, top right, on conservation framing, go down to the one on backing......follow down until you come to the article on conservation by Orton. Should maybe be of some help.

It's gone! THE TOF! thought I'd search there but otherwise hadn't missed it.
 
A

Angela

Guest
Thanks for the tip! I read (or re-read) most of the information, but I'm still unsure of the best approach here. I'm using rag mats as a backing and lining the rabbet of the frames with tape to seal the wood, but my problem is with keeping the glass off the piece. Because of it's shape, the halo part of the icon sticks up about 3/4 of an inch. If could use spacers, but is the adhesive on those conservation quality? If I use rag mat strips to line the inside of the frame and hold the glass off the icon, how do I affix the strips? Silicone? Glue? Acid-free ATG?

I didn't see any information relating to creating space between the glass and artwork so I'm still confused. . ..

Thanks again,
Angela
 

MerpsMom

<span style="color: red"><b><i>Charter Member</i><
In Orton's Answers, isn't there something about "Good Glue"? It's a white glue product and I thought I remembered that it was given the GHSOA. Even the best cp practices can't expect this stuff to be held together by sheer will. I'd probably use a sandwich of 4-ply rag strips, glued together to form the spacer, adhered to the sides of the frame with the same glue to keep the glass away. Sounds like an elegant piece.
 
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framer

Guest
I turned the TOF back on for a day or two so you could search it.

Angela, I turn your access on to check it out. Just use your name and pass word for access.
 

MerpsMom

<span style="color: red"><b><i>Charter Member</i><
Then does that mean that if we needed the TOF for some valid reason, you could reinstate it at your convenience for that issue? Seems like a good deal, if so.
 
F

framer

Guest
Yes if I feel it could help.

I also might bring a few threads over to the grumble.
 
A

Angela

Guest
Thanks Framer! I used to have access to the TOF but that was too many passwords ago for me to remember the right one.

Appreciate everybody's help on this one!
Angela
 
S

Scarfinger

Guest
Getting back to the original question - conservation of the Icon. Most of our conservation techniques in framing are based on framing paper and this Icon is probably made of wood. It also has brass - if it's that old I wonder if it's actually gold? The conservation needs may be different than that for paper. I would like to know how it has been stored for the past 300 or so years. I wonder if some of the materials including the wood and finishes are hydroscopic (absorb and give off water vapour according to the humidity) and if so the framer should be careful to make sure the frame breathes. It would be a good idea to be aware of the humidity where it will be displayed. Too wet may cause problems with the finishes and too dry may cause the wood to crack. This is a difficult project from a conservation point of view and may need special expertise.
 
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