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Golf club hardware

bobtnailer

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Howdy, y'all!

The owner of our local country club has asked us to build and install shadow boxes for a few vintage golf clubs.

And by "a few", I mean somewhere close to 1,000 clubs.

Loooong story short (sort of), this guy bought a collection of clubs from a private collector, paying a smooth $40,000 for the lot. It includes every model / variation of Ping putters, hundreds of single irons / woods, and about a dozen sets of clubs (with and without bags).

Of course, this is an ENORMOUS undertaking (it might take me most of a weekend to build all of these). One of the questions I have up front is about hardware to mount a club into its box. Note that these are not intended to be easily removable - they need to be permanently affixed in their respective boxes. Of course, they absolutely cannot be scratched, dented, or otherwise damaged in the process. From what I have seen, all of the clubs have been used, so they have marks from typical use. But if they decide to remove one from its new home, my mounting has to be such that it doesn't cause any new marks.

Does anyone have a favorite piece / type of rigid hardware for golf clubs?


TIA!

Cody
 

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Lafontsee

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
If I was doing just a few of them, I'd do formed rod mounts shaped into hooks to tightly hold the shafts and covered with heat-shrink tubing to hold them in place. The thought of doing 1000 of them would just be overwhelming and take forever.

Maybe you could use some wire covered with an appropriately colored heat-shrink tubing punched through your backer and twisted off. As long as they don't need to sit away from your backer this should work.

I don't know of anything specifically made for this purpose.

Good luck!
James​
 

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Because they don't have to be removable, I would "stitch" them using wire as James suggested. Because it can be twisted behind the backing, it would be much quicker to do than formed rod mounts.
:cool: Rick
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Because they don't have to be removable, I would "stitch" them using wire as James suggested. Because it can be twisted behind the backing, it would be much quicker to do than formed rod mounts.
:cool: Rick
I agree.
You might even use a solid core electrical wire in a small gauge that has a colored jacket to blend with the clubs and then twist behind the backing as was suggested.
You wouldn't have to deal with making formed rods or using heat shrink tubing.

Another possibility is using zip ties thru the backing.
Black, clear or colors in various gauges.
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Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
If your customer really wants the clubs permanently mounted, then clear polyester film (Mylar-D or Melinex 516) straps would probably be my first choice, with the clubs elevated on support-blocks trimmed from scraps of fluted polypropylene (aka Coroplast). Mounting substrates would be the same sheet material, 6 mm to 10 mm thick, depending on total weight of the items mounted in each frame.

For each frame, my procedure would be to arrange the layout of clubs, glue the support-blocks in place using a good adhesive for plastics, such as Cyanoacrylate (aka CA or Super Glue). The board and blocks would be covered with matching fabric, and ten I'd mount the clubs using clear film straps pulled through slots (made by pushing a #11 X-Acto knife through from the front) in the fabric-covered mounting board.

However, I would suggest using Slider frames and removable mounts. Each assembly would involve inner & outer frames, which might boost the cost. But the mounting could be as simple as padded Pegboard hooks (or similar) glued in place, which might require much less mounting labor. I'd still use Coroplast for the mounting substrates.
 

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
You might even use a solid core electrical wire in a small gauge that has a colored jacket to blend with the clubs and then twist behind the backing as was suggested.
That's what I was thinking too. You used to be able to get a spool of wire that had about five colors of insulation on thin wires in a sort of ribbon. I believe it was called rainbow Wire. These would have been perfect.
:cool: Rick

Update: Just saw THIS on eBay. Two conductor version. These colors would probably be great for the gold clubs project.
 
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