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Hing mounting???

DS

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
I have a customer that wants a numbered print framed with no mat. There is a 1" white margin around the print. The frame will go right up to the white space. Normally with a mat I would use see-thru mounting strips. Since the print will go all the way to the edges of the foamboard - what is the best way to mount the print?
Thanks, Dan
 
888

Lafontsee

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
If the piece is small enough and the paper is stiff enough to support itself, I'd just put it in the frame with only a backer, no mount. If it needs additional support, a few Japanese paper hinges at the top and a couple of support hinges at the bottom corners should do fine. In either case, make sure not to fit it too tightly into the frame so as to constrict the edges of the paper.

If it's not hugely valuable, I would offer the client a mount using KoolTack Preserve or ArtCare Restore.

James
 

DS

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
If the piece is small enough and the paper is stiff enough to support itself, I'd just put it in the frame with only a backer, no mount. If it needs additional support, a few Japanese paper hinges at the top and a couple of support hinges at the bottom corners should do fine. In either case, make sure not to fit it too tightly into the frame so as to constrict the edges of the paper.

If it's not hugely valuable, I would offer the client a mount using KoolTack Preserve or ArtCare Restore.

James
Thanks!
 

shayla

WOW Framer
If you plan to have the art against the glazing, you might use acrylic rather than glass. Pressing paper against glass creates a risk of future moisture formation and subsequent damage on the surface of the art.
 

DS

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
If you plan to have the art against the glazing, you might use acrylic rather than glass. Pressing paper against glass creates a risk of future moisture formation and subsequent damage on the surface of the art.
I plan on using econospace spacer on back of glass to keep the glass off of the print.
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
I have used this technique on large posters....

You need a wide rabbet (30mm) or extend the rabbet with a slip. The work is hinged at the top to a board
and loosely hinged at the sides. The trick is the jack-up the back of the slip a small amount so the paper goes
under, but is not constrained in any way. A narrow strip of linen tape is enough spacing. The glass sits on top
of the slip.

You can rout out the rabbet and use a blind spacer, but that involves woodwork. o_O


 

DS

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
I have used this technique on large posters....

You need a wide rabbet (30mm) or extend the rabbet with a slip. The work is hinged at the top to a board
and loosely hinged at the sides. The trick is the jack-up the back of the slip a small amount so the paper goes
under, but is not constrained in any way. A narrow strip of linen tape is enough spacing. The glass sits on top
of the slip.

You can rout out the rabbet and use a blind spacer, but that involves woodwork. o_O


Thanks, Dan
 

wpfay

Angry Badger
Dan, the risk you run straight framing, even with a spacer, is reaction to environmental changes. The paper will contact and expand with changes in humidity, and if it expands enough so the edge of the paper contacts the edge (cheek) of the rabbet, it may cause cockling.
In addition, the chances of getting acid burn from the natural oxidation of the frame increases with proximity to the wooden frame. the rule of thumb is that no paper-borne art should be within 1" of a wooden framing element. All to be taken with a grain of salt depending on the value and purpose of the art.
 
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