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Huge crosstitch with...glitter!

innerframer

Grumbler
I had a customer bring in two huge crosstitchs (22" x 45" and 26" x 69") and they are liberally decorated with gold glitter. I feel like my shop is now and will forever more be infested. I was initially thinking about the usual stretch around foam core, mat, glass (but not acrylic because of static) and frame, but am reconsidering because of the material size limitations. If we did forgo a mat and go with acrylic, it might actually keep the glitter in place and I know that there isn't the same condensation issue as there is with glass and paper. Another far out thought is to spray a light fixative on the glitter, but it makes me cringe. I guess I'm looking for any thoughts, concerns, ideas before put together a quote. Thanks!
 
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Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
I would have respectfully declined to do those. I consider glitter to be like toxic waste that can never be completely eliminated from your environment. The handling that would be required to mount those would likely distribute the stuff far and wide. NOT WORTH IT. (to me)
:eek: Rick

Did I mention I hate glitter?
 

Lafontsee

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
I've got no help for the glitter. I hate the stuff as well. Optium Museum Acrylic will not have static issues, but be quite pricey. Especially for the bigger one, it's probably the best choice.

For what it's worth, at this size, I would consider using a stiffer substrate like ACM. Since you are matting it, you can staple the perimeter of the piece directly to the ACM with a pneumatic stapler. You'll need an additional backer since most staples will shoot all the way through the thin ACM.

James
 

Wilson

Grumbler
Properly cleaned regular clear acrylic shouldn't have too much static to be used, just make sure to use Novus #1 or something similar to clean it and do a good job of it, front and back.

I would inform of the client of the nature of their work and what the risks are (static and loose glitter) and then go ahead and do all of the work over an area that has drop cloths or some other protection / containment.

You should be fine the way you were originally thinking.

If you do anything else in a bid to solve a problem that the customer doesn't know they have - get paid for it.
 

innerframer

Grumbler
I would have respectfully declined to do those. I consider glitter to be like toxic waste that can never be completely eliminated from your environment. The handling that would be required to mount those would likely distribute the stuff far and wide. NOT WORTH IT. (to me)
:eek: Rick

Did I mention I hate glitter?
It was a bit of a sneak attack. He opened them up on the bench and I said, "Ooh, pretty! Is that metallic thread?" Then, oh nooo. It's already made it to my home. My hubby had a piece of glitter on his chin this morning!
 

innerframer

Grumbler
I've got no help for the glitter. I hate the stuff as well. Optium Museum Acrylic will not have static issues, but be quite pricey. Especially for the bigger one, it's probably the best choice.

For what it's worth, at this size, I would consider using a stiffer substrate like ACM. Since you are matting it, you can staple the perimeter of the piece directly to the ACM with a pneumatic stapler. You'll need an additional backer since most staples will shoot all the way through the thin ACM.

James
I had forgotten about ACM. Thanks for the reminder!
 

innerframer

Grumbler
Properly cleaned regular clear acrylic shouldn't have too much static to be used, just make sure to use Novus #1 or something similar to clean it and do a good job of it, front and back.

I would inform of the client of the nature of their work and what the risks are (static and loose glitter) and then go ahead and do all of the work over an area that has drop cloths or some other protection / containment.

You should be fine the way you were originally thinking.

If you do anything else in a bid to solve a problem that the customer doesn't know they have - get paid for it.
I just did a bunch of frames with acrylic so have learned a lot about how to handle static and think that a little bit might actually be helpful in this situation.
Thanks and I will definitely factor in a PITA fee!
 

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
It was a bit of a sneak attack. He opened them up on the bench and I said, "Ooh, pretty! Is that metallic thread?" Then, oh nooo. It's already made it to my home. My hubby had a piece of glitter on his chin this morning!
:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

I wonder if they have glitter abatement services, like they do for asbestos.
:mad: Rick
 
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Pat Kotnour

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
You can wrap it on foam core and use the fine fabric tagging tool and quarter inch fasteners to stretch it. It's about the simplest way to stretch needlework, especially that large of one.
 

wpfay

Angry Badger
Just.
Say.
No.

Or just quote so high that will either leave with the work or it will be worth your while to deal with it.
Customer will have to understand that the glitter will get n the mat and there's nothing you can do about that.
I would also use something a bit more rigid than foam core to stretch.
 

shayla

WOW Framer
Also, that stretching could cause even more glitter to pop off. If you do this job, I hope you have fun. Wear disco pants and play 'I Will Survive'. :D
 
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