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New member looking for insight on older CTD D20 saw

Poplar Guy

Grumbler in Training
Wondering if anyone has some input on one of these older CTD D20 saws. I'm considering purchasing one, and am wondering about the accuracy of the cuts, is there any additional tweaking of joints that needs to be done after the cuts to ensure a gap-free joint?

Are they fairly trouble-free to own/operate in a work environment?

Thank you
 
888

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Wondering if anyone has some input on one of these older CTD D20 saws. I'm considering purchasing one, and am wondering about the accuracy of the cuts, is there any additional tweaking of joints that needs to be done after the cuts to ensure a gap-free joint?

Are they fairly trouble-free to own/operate in a work environment?

Thank you
CTD makes good saws.
I used a CTD D45AX for about 14 years and I am using a D45 now.

I'm not familiar with the D20.
I know that it's a dual miter saw, and operated with 2 levers, one for the left cut and one for the right.
The D45AX is a dual miter saw operated by air, tap the peddle and the blades come down and cut and retract.
The D45 is the same saw without the air operation. You step down on a peddle in front and it's like a chopper.

What's most important, even more than the saw, are the blades.
Bad quality blades or badly sharpened blades can make a top of the line saw cut poorly and top quality blades, well sharpened can make a cheaper saw cut fine.
I recommend Quinn Saw for blades and sharpening.
http://www.quinnsaw.com
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
CTD makes good saws.
I used a CTD D45AX for about 14 years and I am using a D45 now.

I'm not familiar with the D20.
I know that it's a dual miter saw, and operated with 2 levers, one for the left cut and one for the right.
The D45AX is a dual miter saw operated by air, tap the pedal and the blades come down and cut and retract.
The D45 is the same saw without the air operation. You step down on a pedal in front and it's like a chopper.

What's most important, even more than the saw, are the blades.
Bad quality blades or badly sharpened blades can make a top of the line saw cut poorly and top quality blades, well sharpened can make a cheaper saw cut fine.
I recommend Quinn Saw for blades and sharpening.
http://www.quinnsaw.com
I corrected the "peddle" to "pedal" in my quote (one of those spell check/correct things) but you get what I mean...;)
By the way, Welcome to the Grumble, Poplar Guy.
 
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Poplar Guy

Grumbler in Training
I corrected the "peddle" to "pedal" in my quote (one of those spell check/correct things) but you get what I mean...;)
By the way, Welcome to the Grumble, Poplar Guy.
Well at least you're not peddling pedals.... :)

All jokes aside, should I be able to expect perfect miters with this saw, considering quality blades and good mechanical condition? I'm not looking to get into another machine only to still have to final dress my miters to get ride of the last bit of gaps.

Everything I've read on these saws points me to Quinn blades, so that's my first call if I decide to buy it. I'm heading there today to give it a look-over.
 

framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
If it is old enough and had alot of use, the bearings might be worn which would give you minutely wonky miters. Not sure to check for out of round.
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
All jokes aside, should I be able to expect perfect miters with this saw, considering quality blades and good mechanical condition? I'm not looking to get into another machine only to still have to final dress my miters to get ride of the last bit of gaps.

Everything I've read on these saws points me to Quinn blades, so that's my first call if I decide to buy it. I'm heading there today to give it a look-over.
I've been framing for almost 50 years now.
I still work full time and on Monday I have to be on-site for a large restaurant installation at 7:00 AM....:eek: (I was supposed to have the day off...:rolleyes:)

That said, as far as "perfect miters", they don't actually exist.
We can have perfect saws with perfect blades and perfect vises and/or vnailers, but the mouldings aren't perfect.
They are often twisted, warped, curved, humped, corkscrewed, one end of the moulding might be 1/8" wider than the other end....o_O
That's where the Macgyver in us comes into play.
We have good saws and blades at work, but we also have 2 Barton electric miter sanders, a number of "squeeze clamps", web clamps, pipe clamps, etc.
Because we have good saws and blades, I don't often have to use the miter sander to get a good join, but once in a while because of warp issues, we can "fudge" the angles in the corners to get a "perfect join".
 

Poplar Guy

Grumbler in Training
Well I wound up buying the saw, thank you all for your insight. The seller had recently moved the saw to an outside storage container (humidity) and cosmetically it looked beat as the deck had surface rust on it. My wife admitted she thought I was nuts for going any further with the inspection. The left motor would start but slowly, seller said "$150 and it's yours". I spent a few minutes tinkering with it alone, pulled the covers on that side and removed the belts. Plugged in the motor again and voila, the motor ran perfect. So the bearings on that side have a good amount of friction in them. I offered $100 and we closed the deal. I've restored a lot of old woodworking machinery in my day and in less than an hour had the deck de-rusted, spit shined and looking like new. There was a box inside the drawer which to my surprise contained a spare set of blades, sharp but with surface rust. I have all 4 blades soaking in white vinegar now to get them cleaned up. Tomorrow on the phone to CTD for a new bearings for both blade shafts and crossing my fingers the left shaft is in good condition. Discussing with the seller he mentioned it ran when he posted the ad, prior to moving it outside. I tend to believe it as there's no runout in the shaft, I believe it hasn't been run with the bad bearing. All in all, I think I took a risk but if the shaft is OK, new belts/bearings and some elbow grease and worst case scenario a new set of blades I'm happy with the deal. I'm garage woodworker who does small batches of frames I make from trees I cut down as well as rough-cut lumber, but I hope when I'm done with this it'll give me the quality I'm looking for without a lot of labor/time correcting imperfect joints. I give them away as gifts during the holidays so this time of year I'm a busy elf.

I've attached a few pictures here of some of the last batch of frames I made from a tree I removed from my property and aged. Hope you all enjoy the pics and thanks again for your help.


*IMG_6777 copy.jpg
 

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Those frames are just beautiful. Love to see what's going in them.
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Could the correct word be Petals??? LOL Sigh, its Monday.
Petals, peddles, pedals......:confused:
Yes, It's Monday ;).
I was supposed to have the day off, but.....
We had to install at a very high end restaurant in Scottsdale.
We had to be there at 7:00 AM so I had to get up at 6:00 AM, it was still dark out.
We worked from 7:00 AM until 2:30 PM to finish the installation so the new restaurant could open at 5:00 PM.
There were other contractors putting in Audio and lighting and the chefs and the designers and the corporate people were there.
Now, I'm just kickin' back (until tomorrow...:eek:o_O:cool::p)...
Screen Shot 2018-11-26 at 7.46.38 PM.png Screen Shot 2018-11-26 at 7.47.43 PM.png Screen Shot 2018-11-26 at 7.47.01 PM.png Screen Shot 2018-11-26 at 7.47.19 PM.png
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
:D Those frames are pure 'wood porn'. :D

Old machinery is often far better build quality than newer stuff. Granted, it often gets neglected and needs a bit
of TLC to get it working well again. But if you have the know-how it well worth the effort. ;)
 

Poplar Guy

Grumbler in Training
Thanks Prospero. Funny you say that, I've got some new machinery and some old machinery, I usually prefer to buy tools from about the WWII era up till about the mid 60's. A time before planned obsolescence was engineered into everything we purchase.

Anyways, went to push out some bearings yesterday and happily found that was all that was needed, so just waiting on new bearings now.

The 4 carbide blades that came with the saw came out shining like a new dime after an overnight bath in white vinegar. I'll drop them off at the sharpener today and hopefully get them back quickly. New belts, bearings, a switch for one motor and some elbow grease and I'm into the saw for a total of $220. Granted, it's not a high production machine but for a hobbyist like myself it'll more than fit the bill. If time allows it should be making frames by the weekend.
 
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