• WELCOME Grumblers
    Backup is now done at 3PM EDT. You may find the server down for up to two minutes at that time.

Help Old seal dry mount press adjustments

brad

Grumbler in Training
I have a very old press that (surprisingly) still works, but the pressure needs to be adjusted so when I leave long prints stick out they don’t get creased by the edge of the platten. It has no model number (perhaps it pre dates the model system) so I have been unable to look up how to adjust. If anyone has any pointers I would be much appreciable. There is a bolt just under the bar on the right and left which I would think would be the one to turn, but I don't want to over torque since it probably hasn't been adjusted in many years.
Thanks in advance.
 

Attachments

888

westman 2

Grumbler
I have a very old press that (surprisingly) still works, but the pressure needs to be adjusted so when I leave long prints stick out they don’t get creased by the edge of the platten. It has no model number (perhaps it pre dates the model system) so I have been unable to look up how to adjust. If anyone has any pointers I would be much appreciable. There is a bolt just under the bar on the right and left which I would think would be the one to turn, but I don't want to over torque since it probably hasn't been adjusted in many years.
Thanks in advance.
looks like a commercial 200
 

Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
That looks a lot like my first one - I bought "Old Frog Eyes" as an antique in 1988...

To prevent creases from the platen's edges, I suggest using a 4-ply matboard overlay on top of release paper, or a release board, which exceeds the edges of the platen on all sides. If your machine's top-pressure is not too much, this should prevent creases during mounting.

Someone here probably has complete instructions for adjusting the pressure, but essentially, you'll want to let the top rest flat and loosely on the pad, and use layers of filler board to create pressure for whatever thickness of substrate you are using for each mounting job. Make sure the pressure is equal on both side of the press, too.

Especially for such an old press, it would be a good idea to check for cold spots and for that, you can buy hand-held devices such as this one.
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Have you tried a thin aluminium (aluminum even:D) sheet to cushion the edge of the platen and diffuse the heat?

I very occasionally use my venerable hard-bed press to mount long things with multiple bites and always do this.
 

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
That sounds like a good idea. It might transfer the beat better than a board. You have to be careful not to burn your fingers handling the hot metal sheet though.
:cool: Rick
 

brad

Grumbler in Training
After further investigation, it gets more complicated. It seems the pressure is greater in the back, and almost as though the bed has dropped down below the support arms so it causes creasing on top of the board. I am trying to save a teardown and still salvage it, but its not looking promising.
 

brad

Grumbler in Training
That looks a lot like my first one - I bought "Old Frog Eyes" as an antique in 1988...

To prevent creases from the platen's edges, I suggest using a 4-ply matboard overlay on top of release paper, or a release board, which exceeds the edges of the platen on all sides. If your machine's top-pressure is not too much, this should prevent creases during mounting.

Someone here probably has complete instructions for adjusting the pressure, but essentially, you'll want to let the top rest flat and loosely on the pad, and use layers of filler board to create pressure for whatever thickness of substrate you are using for each mounting job. Make sure the pressure is equal on both side of the press, too.

Especially for such an old press, it would be a good idea to check for cold spots and for that, you can buy hand-held devices such as this one.

BTW, I love "Old Frog Eyes." I never thought about it, but once I read it I won't forget it!
 

wpfay

Angry Badger
Differential pressure front to back could be that the hinges from which the platen hangs are not moving freely. The platen should swing front to back in its carriage, if even just a few degrees.
Side to side adjustments would probably require shimming those same hinges until the platen is equal distance from the bed at each end.
 
Sponsor Wanted
Top