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Perfect Mount problem

Hazany

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
We mounted a doctoral degree with Crescent Perfectmount. We had hinged it the first time but the customer wanted it to be more flat.
The mounting went well and the paper seemed very flat. We placed the mounted piece under a heavy weight. Usually we wait at least 24 hours but someone needed the weight for something else and removed the degree. We came back today to see that the paper is all wrinkled. I am not sure if the lack of pressure caused the problem.
I am wondering if there is a safe way to remove the paper and start over. When I press on the wrinkles they get flattened but still look bad. I don't want to use UNDO as its will probably permanently stain the paper.
Thanks in advance.
Bruce
 
888

Lafontsee

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
It sounds like the degree is on animal-skin vellum instead of paper. Those things will never be perfectly flat. You were probably better off leaving it hinged and just informing the client that this is the nature of their item. Others may chime in with their best practices for dealing with them. Maybe Jim Miller's method of using twisted linen thread would be helpful in this case?

James
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
The key thing with pressure-sensitive mounting board is pressure. (The clue's in the name. 😛)

You need and enormous amount of even pressure to get a good bond. You just can't achieve this with a roller.
The problem is it will stick unevenly, so bits will fail where others will hold fast. If bumps form where the adhesive
has failed they will not be flattenable without releasing the whole thing. You will have great difficulty releasing it.
And then the paper will need the services of an expert restorer to flatten it.

This method of mounting is best regarded as a temporary thing. It may be quick and convenient, but I wouldn't trust it.
 

Hazany

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Thank you. If there is no safe way of removing the diploma, I would have to inform the customer.
 

echavez123

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Scan it, fix in Photoshop, reprint and mount - just a thought? We make replicas of diplomas and even add an effect for colored foil, which looks pretty darn good.
 

snafu

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
You need and enormous amount of even pressure to get a good bond.
A vacuum press should work. @29 hg it's about 14.25 psi, It doesn't sound like much until multiply it over the entire area of the 40x60 vacuum press or the item you are mounting. a 40x60 poster would have about 34,000 pounds of pressure on it.
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
A vacuum press should work. @29 hg it's about 14.25 psi, It doesn't sound like much until multiply it over the entire area of the 40x60 vacuum press or the item you are mounting. a 40x60 poster would have about 34,000 pounds of pressure on it.
Granted. Same for a roller press. But people use sticky board when they don't want the bother of cranking up a press
or they haven't got one. That's when they come unstuck. 😯
 

Hazany

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
We have a roller press and a dry mount press. I just made an error not using them. Here is the picture:
Many years ago I was able to order a replacement diploma for someone but it took six months. Has anyone had this same experience?

IMG_4224.JPG
 

artfolio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
I had two replacement diploma situations in my working life:

One was from a local university and it had a large blob of carbon embedded in the paper. I pointed it out to the client and she contacted the university. They printed a new one straight away, collected it and handed over the faulty one. It was easy because they recovered the bad one - had it simply been lost they would have required a statutory declaration and the replacement would have been marked as a replacement.

The second one was from the University of South Africa and had been glued onto plywood then damaged by water to the point that it was barely legible. the customer wrote to the university with a photograph (yep, it was a while ago) and was told they would not replace it "because it had not been destroyed":nuts:????
 

snafu

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
before trying to replace it I would do a test, mount a photo or print to perfect mount turn on your dry mount press heat it up and try to remove it.
 

Pat Murphey

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
It just doesn't work to try to flatten wavy pieces onto a "glue" surface with any kind of press. It is even high risk on a surface where the paper can slide. Those waves will just turn into creases. It's just the nature of paper where the waves permanently change the dimension of the surface to accommodate the distance over the wave. Live with the waves or pay a conservator if it is even possible to recover the flat surface.
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
It just doesn't work to try to flatten wavy pieces onto a "glue" surface with any kind of press. It is even high risk on a surface where the paper can slide. Those waves will just turn into creases. It's just the nature of paper where the waves permanently change the dimension of the surface to accommodate the distance over the wave. Live with the waves or pay a conservator if it is even possible to recover the flat surface.
Very true. Once the fibres of the paper have pulled apart they can't be forced back again. The whole surface would have
to be relaxed. It's like trying to push toothpaste back into the tube.
 
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