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Plexiglas Advice

Discussion in 'The Grumble' started by Ameliasmd, Nov 15, 2017.

  1. Ameliasmd

    Ameliasmd Grumbler in Training

    I'm working on a frameless frame. I would like to use a quality plexiglas. I was looking at OP3, and OP3 P99 for a non glare option. From what I've read, it seems that TruVue and Acrylite are similar? Is this true? Is TruVu a better quality? Would anyone recommend one over the other? Thank you!
     
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  2. Larry Peterson

    Larry Peterson PFG, Picture Framing God

    In the beginning there was Cyro which made FF3, P99, OP3 and OP3P99. TruVue didn't make or sell acrylic.

    Then TruVu started selling acrylic which they bought from Cyro and branded with the TruVu name.

    Cyro begat (became) Evonik.

    At some point TruVu started using another source for their acrylic. It's unclear if they still source some from Evonik.

    I use both Evonik and TruVu; Evonik for FF3, P99 and OP3 and TruVu for OP3P99. I see no difference except that Evonik costs a little less.

    There isn't finer picture framing acrylic than Evonik or TruVu. I would use either with no worries.
     
    monkey likes this.
  3. Ameliasmd

    Ameliasmd Grumbler in Training

    Thanks Larry! That's good to know. Is FF3 a lower grade than OP3?
     
  4. Larry Peterson

    Larry Peterson PFG, Picture Framing God

    FF3 is regular Premium Clear Acrylic with minimal UV Protection (around 66% if I remember right) . This is the base acrylic, same as plain framing glass. OP3 is 99% UV Protective.
     
  5. Ameliasmd

    Ameliasmd Grumbler in Training

    Interesting! Thank you so so much! I'm gonna order the OP3 this afternoon! Thanks again!
     
  6. Acrylic Queen

    Acrylic Queen CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2

    Just so you know FF3 is the acrylic from Evonik that is "picture framing grade" inspected and guarenteed to be flawless as opposed to FF. All of the acrylic manufacturers have their own letters and numbers to identify their product lines. Evonik manufacturers "acrylite" their products are FF, FF3, OP3, P99, OP3P99. To the best of my knowledge and information TruVue started with Evonik OP3 product to make Optium Museum acrylic by coating the acrylic to achieve the effect of Museum Glass. I believe they now use Plaskolite as the base material for Optium.
     
    monkey likes this.
  7. David Waldmann

    David Waldmann SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer

    I'm sorry, we have encountered a system error. Please restate your question using human logic.
     
  8. Acrylic Queen

    Acrylic Queen CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2

    By the way. Plexiglas is also a "brand name." The generic name of the product in it's many forms is ACRYLIC. It's a special kind of plastic.
     
    monkey likes this.
  9. dpframing

    dpframing CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2

    FROM WHAT I'M TOLD, OP-3 blocks 99.3% of UV light. TruVue UV acrylic blocks 99%. Apparently, that extra .3% is a big deal since it blocks some of the more harmful UV rays.
    But I use TruVue UV acrylic over OP-3 and I'll tell you why. In 2014, I had lens replacement surgery in both eyes due to cataracts. After I had the surgery, colors REALLY came alive for me,
    especially whites, and I saw for the first time just how much tint that OP-3 has. And sometimes matching the white of the paper of a work of art with the matting was impossible with the OP-3.
    The white of the art would go one way, and the white mat would go another way. So IMHO, the use of OP-3 defeats its own purpose in matters of displaying art. The extra protection
    just is not worth it.
     
    neilframer likes this.
  10. neilframer

    neilframer PFG, Picture Framing God

    Interesting info.
    I am 65 and I haven't had any eye surgery.
    I only wear glasses to see beyond about 30 feet so I only wear glasses when I drive.

    In the frame shop, my eyesight is very sharp and I can see a speck under the glass from a good distance away.
    I have been blessed (cursed:cool:) with eyesight that is perfect for picture framing.
    Some of the other framers, who are half my age, don't like this but I can't help it.
    I was once told by an employer many years ago to close one eye when I looked at finished work.o_O

    I am going to have to look at the differences that you pointed out between OP-3 and TruVue.
    I appreciate the info.
     
    dpframing likes this.
  11. Ameliasmd

    Ameliasmd Grumbler in Training

    Thank you! So is Optium Museum acrylic, a different class than OP3?
     
  12. Ameliasmd

    Ameliasmd Grumbler in Training

    HA! Yes ... there's no frame! It's acrylic mounted over a photograph. Some folks glue everything together, which I don't agree with, so I've worked with an engineer to create my own version!
     
  13. Ameliasmd

    Ameliasmd Grumbler in Training

    That's good to know. I like the term acrylic more, Plexiglas sounds flimsier.
     
  14. Ameliasmd

    Ameliasmd Grumbler in Training

    Oh, how interesting! Thanks! I guess I'll get a sample piece of each. Is that true of the OP3 P99 as well?
     
  15. dpframing

    dpframing CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2

    I'll bet it is but I don't know for sure.
     
  16. Jim Miller

    Jim Miller SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God

    UV blocking is important for preservation framing, but in showing art, the main objective is to transmit as much of the visible radiation (light, which carries color) as possible.

    It's been a few years since I checked the charts, but as I recall, the added percentage of UV blocking results from blocking wavelengths up to 400 nanometers. That includes some wavelengths going from violet into the blue range, which are visible to some people. I believe Tru Vue's product blocks only up to 380 nm, in order to avoid blocking any of those possibly-visible blue wavelengths.

    That extra blocking may be a slight bonus, but is it essential? The preservation standards call for UV blocking of 97% or better. If you use any glazing that blocks 97% or more UV radiation, then the worst potential damage would come from visible light in wavelengths nobody wants blocked.

    PPFA Comparative Guidelines for Glazing, published in 2015, provides a wealth of information about the specifications for framing glazing products.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2017
    Joe B likes this.
  17. dpframing

    dpframing CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2

    Yes, and I really don't think that added protection of 20 nm that OP-3 offers over TruVue justifies that ugly yellow tint that it has. It
    violates all the color values of the art. Especially when white fields are involved.
     
  18. Acrylic Queen

    Acrylic Queen CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2

    You need to understand that TruVue does not produce its own acrylic. The acrylic they sell is simply another brand, not Acrylite (OP3) that they have labeled. If you are purchasing regular clear acrylic, it will be colorless. If you are purchasing UV filtering acrylic it may have a slight tint to it. You would be well served to do a comparison of at least 3 or 4 major brands. Acrylite, Plexiglas, Optix, Lucite. It has been my experience that Acrylite has the least amount of color. One product is very purple, another very yellow, another very green or blue from the edge. If you haven't looked at all of these side by side then your eyes may be deceiving you. Remember what I said in the beginning, "only regular clear is colorless." While acrylic by its very nature filters more of the harmful UV rays than glass it cannot be considered conservation or preservation if it is not UV filtering. Glass is coated to make it UV filtering, acrylic is NOT, it is part of the chemical process and has no coating. If you look at UV filtering glass you may also see a slight color at the edge, of course glass is usually seen as green at the edge. When TruVue produces Optium Museum acrylic, they coat the acrylic in much the same way used to make Conservation clear or Museum glass. Do not expect your acrylic supplier to be knowledgeable about acrylic especially designed for picture framers unless they are part of the picture framing industry. It is important that YOU understand the products so that you are asking for the correct product to serve your purpose.
     
  19. David Waldmann

    David Waldmann SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer

    I just remember being at the Franklin Institute. I was "in the industry" at that time, but very very early on - probably 30 years ago. There was a display that had two samples of glass, both around 10 feet long/deep as I recall. One was "window glass" and one was, I don't remember - maybe "'fiber optic grade', maybe something 'possible-but-not-commerically-available' or maybe 'world's-best-picture-frame-glazing'(ok, probably not)", but you could look through the one and it was like it wasn't even there, and the other was just a wall.
     
  20. dpframing

    dpframing CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2

    Here's what I understand. I use TruVue Conservation Clear acrylic glazing. Whoever actually makes it, I don't know and I don't care. The product that TruVue packages and sells offers UV protection- not 67% like regular clear acrylic, but 99% protection against harmful UV rays, which makes it totally appropriate for conservation applications. AND it has virtually no tint, filters off 99% of UV rays, and unlike OP-3, which has a strong yellow tint to it, is basically CLEAR.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2017
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