Sanding Moulding

Stephen Enggass

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
I'm aware that some people use a sander - I would assume to just clean up a cut. However, I've read that some framers will use a sander to correct a poor miter cut. My question is, knowing that it is crucial that opposing ends of a frame are equal in length, how does someone not mess up this critical detail when sanding a piece. Looking for any light that can be shed on the use of sanding picture frame moulding. Thanks.
Steve
 
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MATTHEW HALE

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
i use a manual disc sander so i know exactly how much i'm taking off each rail. if i turn the wheel 5 times on one stick, i do the same to every other stick. And if i only have one bad cut to correct, i still sand both ends of each rail, just because.
 

CHolt

Grumbler
I don't sand my miters but if I have any doubt that the rails are equal length I lay out each pair on my bench either back to back or base to base, align one end of each with its pair and look to see how the opposite ends align. If there is a difference I correct it, in my case with my miter saw, but I suppose those who sand their miters must take the longer rail back to the disk sander.
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
I never got this miter sanding. 🙄

To me it's trying to correct a fault of another machine. It's an extra thing to do and another machine to buy.

Why not fix the shortcomings of the saw/chopper? 🤔
 

wpfay

Forum Support Team Angry_Badger
Staff member
Peter, I think the miter sander fills the gap (or sands it away) for shops that are strictly chop. The sanders are relatively compact compared to a saw or chopper and not as expensive to own or maintain.
I do agree with you in principle about the need for one in a shop that has mitering capabilities, but some of us just like collecting tools.
 

Dave

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
I found a manual sander invaluable in fitting fillets.
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
I found a manual sander invaluable in fitting fillets.
I do the same thing.
When we have Fillets for frames or mats, we have a fillet chopper and I use it or the saw and I cut the fillet slightly larger than what I need.
Then, I use the sander, we have 2 Barton sanders, to sand the fillet to fit perfectly in the frame or mat.
I also glue and join the fillets in the Stanley corner clamps like frames and then fit the finished fillets to the frames or the reverse bevelled mats.
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
I do the same thing.
When we have Fillets for frames or mats, we have a fillet chopper and I use it or the saw and I cut the fillet slightly larger than what I need.
Then, I use the sander, we have 2 Barton sanders, to sand the fillet to fit perfectly in the frame or mat.
I also glue and join the fillets in the Stanley corner clamps like frames and then fit the finished fillets to the frames or the reverse bevelled mats.
I should also note that the Barton sanders that we have are electric.
They aren't made anymore but they are excellent and they have many uses in the shop.
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Tom1234

Grumbler
Keep in mind that the length of the rails may not be the only problem. This seems obvious, but make sure the miters are truly 45 degrees. I only make custom frames (usually from exotic wood) for a specific place in a home. Over time, my miter saw was off by less than 1/2 of one degree. This lead to a bad corner. I adjusted the saw back to true 45 degrees; problem solved.
 

cjmst3k

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
We use a double bladed Pistorius. I don't see the need for a sander at all, and haven't seen one at any of the shops I've worked at.
 

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
We use a double bladed Pistorius. I don't see the need for a sander at all, and haven't seen one at any of the shops I've worked at.
Ditto here. My ITW Sander has been a boat anchor (if I had a boat) since I got my Pistorious EMN-12 a dozen years ago.
 

wvframer

Forum Support Team
Staff member
If you are using a Pistorius and see the need for sanding, probably reconditioning the blades is a good idea.
 

MATTHEW HALE

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
for those of you who do use a disc sander, what grit do you prefer and why?
 

framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
I find the main reason for having a sander is for Roma chops. They are consistant if nothing else.

My sanding discs are 100 grit but I guess that is the only one DonMar carries.

On the plus side, I only need a couple revolutions and it is done.
 

MATTHEW HALE

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
i find that the 100 grit tends to leave the edges of gessoed moulding a little rough; just wondering if anyone has had any luck with finer grit.
 
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