• WELCOME Grumblers
    Backup is now done at 3PM EDT. You may find the server down for up to two minutes at that time.

Tabernacle Frame with Pitched Roof

Woodworks by John

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Working on a design for a tabernacle frame and have seen them with a low pitched roof. Anyone have any hints on how to pull it off? As a furniture maker I've made those traditional flag presentation cases but that angle isn't as acute as what I've drawn so those can be carefully mitered and glue/clamp together. If anyone's aware of a trick to accomplish it I'd appreciate it. I've attached a picture, the roof is about 27" long. Thanks!


Roof - 1.jpg
 
888

bruce papier

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
I'm going to hash this up trying to explain what I mean, but... In the pieces I've seen like this, the miter at the sharp corners aren't cut like a corner on a frame where the cut bisects the angle. The joint is made by keeping the top two legs straight with no bevel at the corner. The bottom leg is beveled on the ends to fit up under the top two sides. That makes the angle less severe.

For example- If you have a triangle that's 120, 30, 30, if you try to miter the corners all the way through, you have to cut 75 degree angles. If you leave the top legs straight, the bottom leg fits underneath with a 30 degree angle on each end. I think.
 

Rick Hennen

Grumbler in Training
Working on a design for a tabernacle frame and have seen them with a low pitched roof. Anyone have any hints on how to pull it off? As a furniture maker I've made those traditional flag presentation cases but that angle isn't as acute as what I've drawn so those can be carefully mitered and glue/clamp together. If anyone's aware of a trick to accomplish it I'd appreciate it. I've attached a picture, the roof is about 27" long. Thanks!


View attachment 31361
If you can give us a good image or drawing, we should be able to make what ever you need on our CNC router Rick - Rian Fabrication Services - www.rianfabrication.com
 

Woodworks by John

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
I'm going to hash this up trying to explain what I mean, but... In the pieces I've seen like this, the miter at the sharp corners aren't cut like a corner on a frame where the cut bisects the angle. The joint is made by keeping the top two legs straight with no bevel at the corner. The bottom leg is beveled on the ends to fit up under the top two sides. That makes the angle less severe.

For example- If you have a triangle that's 120, 30, 30, if you try to miter the corners all the way through, you have to cut 75 degree angles. If you leave the top legs straight, the bottom leg fits underneath with a 30 degree angle on each end. I think.
 

Woodworks by John

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Thanks Bruce, that makes perfect sense and eliminates that sharp and fragile corner. Should be fairly easy to calculate angle, cut it and then block plane to fit. No CNC required, sharp hand tools, steady eye and hand and a few spare pieces just in case!!
 

Woodworks by John

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
I'm going to hash this up trying to explain what I mean, but... In the pieces I've seen like this, the miter at the sharp corners aren't cut like a corner on a frame where the cut bisects the angle. The joint is made by keeping the top two legs straight with no bevel at the corner. The bottom leg is beveled on the ends to fit up under the top two sides. That makes the angle less severe.

For example- If you have a triangle that's 120, 30, 30, if you try to miter the corners all the way through, you have to cut 75 degree angles. If you leave the top legs straight, the bottom leg fits underneath with a 30 degree angle on each end. I think.

Bruce, thanks for your reply, here's a picture of how the thing came out! I'll do some fine tuning with a block plane and trim
I'm going to hash this up trying to explain what I mean, but... In the pieces I've seen like this, the miter at the sharp corners aren't cut like a corner on a frame where the cut bisects the angle. The joint is made by keeping the top two legs straight with no bevel at the corner. The bottom leg is beveled on the ends to fit up under the top two sides. That makes the angle less severe.

For example- If you have a triangle that's 120, 30, 30, if you try to miter the corners all the way through, you have to cut 75 degree angles. If you leave the top legs straight, the bottom leg fits underneath with a 30 degree angle on each end. I think.
Thanks Bruce, here's how it all came out. After drawing it full size I figured the angle was 17° on chop saw and 73° on the tablesaw. The inner pieces are for support and also to attach a piece of 1/4" MDF to the front. Then I'll make some small molding to refine the edge and we're done! Your answer made a lot of sense and I appreciate it -- this eliminates that sharp corner plus it overhangs a slight amount so it can be squared. I'll write a blog when this projects complete. Roof - 1 (1).jpg
 
Sponsor Wanted
Top