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Who uses fractions like this???

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
We used to play happily for hours with a bottle of mercury in the science lab. :eek:

It never affected me though. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
Speak for yourself.

 

wpfay

Angry Badger
Can't remember just who it was but I worked with some professional organization that measured in tenths of inches. I would get specific mat measurements in this format. Fortunately the Wizard speaks that language and I didn't have to convert the decimals to fractions.
Back in the 8th grade at Clarke County Jr. High in Athens, Ga. I took a course in Quantitative Physical Science. We learned all the metric measuring systems and how they are all intertwined, and the other more arcane systems used throughout the world. I guess it struck a chord with me since I remember little else from the academics of that year. I do remember that Kim Basinger was a classmate. In her class picture, she was wearing her cheerleader outfit and her boyfriend's letter sweater. That was the year she had braces on her teeth. So summing up 8th grade looks like a crush on Kim and QPS. Yep.
 

artfolio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
David, from what I can gather and surmise Common Core is trying to teach critical thinking skills and relationships between numbers. I think that they are trying to make learning higher math like Calculus easier. Problem being that they are trying to teach everyone by the same method, not by what works best for the person.

From what I see when adding 7 + 9 the concept is that adding 5 and 10 is easy so 7=5+2 and 9 = 10-1 So 7 + 9 = (5+2) +(10-1) = (10+5) +(2-1) = 15 + 2 - 1 =16.
............................. Common Core would have killed me in high school but would have insured a ton of tutoring money in college helping others learn math the right way :)

I can remember learning maths by adding and removing plastic counters and counting the ones left. Then we graduated to replacing the counters with symbols (numbers). Later we graduated to singing our way through the tables which, logically led to long division. This was an eye-opener to my Mother who had been taught to divide by using continuous subtraction.

I was, and still am, good at "straight" maths and perform most calculations in my head including adding up a dozen or so numbers without using a calculator but start mixing numbers and letters as in Algebra and it just don't compute any more. :eek: Whatever use this "higher math" has is something that has always eluded me - my life has never depended on solving a quadratic equation and I am not even sure I would recognise one if I met it. My younger daughter, on the other hand lapped it up and became a microbiologist.

The point I would make to the gurus who design these over-complicated ways of teaching simple concepts is this: Fewer than 5% of the kids you teach will be smart enough to move into professions where higher math is needed so why inflict it on everyone?
 

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
[QUOTE="artfolio, post: Fewer than 5% of the kids you teach will be smart enough to move into professions where higher math is needed so why inflict it on everyone?[/QUOTE]

Same with Shakespeare. All those hours lost in high school could have been put towards financial planning, contract law, real estate basics, credit management, and other useful things to help kids become responsible adults.
 

Jeff Rodier

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
I have identified one real world example of where common core is used today.

TOILET PAPER MATH

That's right folks, how can the new 4 roll single equal 4 rolls of toilet paper without them making the core smaller. If this scam isn't Common Core Math I don't know what is since the old single roll used most of the space available on the dispenser but now 4 rolls fit in the same amount of space without making the cardboard core any smaller.
 

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
I have identified one real world example of where common core is used today.

TOILET PAPER MATH

That's right folks, how can the new 4 roll single equal 4 rolls of toilet paper without them making the core smaller. If this scam isn't Common Core Math I don't know what is since the old single roll used most of the space available on the dispenser but now 4 rolls fit in the same amount of space without making the cardboard core any smaller.
Here's the common core solution to that toilet paper math question: they made the roll narrower.
 

Jeff Rodier

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Not only that they must have reduced the single roll down to just about a dozen sheets.
 

artfolio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
That reminds me of a "Reader's Digest" joke about some graffiti in the toilet: Someone had written above the paper dispenser

Arts Degrees: Pull

For Honours, Pull twice

A not so subtle reminder that a lot of the students who spend 4 - 5 years at university do not necessarily end up getting the best jobs.
 

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
I have identified one real world example of where common core is used today....the old single roll used most of the space available on the dispenser but now 4 rolls fit in the same amount of space without making the cardboard core any smaller.
That sounds like CARDBOARD CORE math. Actually, the Kirkland brand from Costco is just as wide as ever, and the rolls contain so much that they won't fit into the built-in wall dispensers of our 1954 ranch house until some has been used up.

...Someone had written above the paper dispenser Arts Degrees: Pull...
That goes back a long way. I remember seeing it in the bathroom when I was in art school in 1972.

:cool: Rick
 
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