Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: warped wavy poster

  1. #1
    True Grumbler
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    South Georgia
    Posts
    93

    Default warped wavy poster

    Here's another poster question...I've got 2 posters a customer brought in that had been in a metal frame unmounted for 20-30 years. They are wavy and buckling and don't want to lay flat. I've look in the archives and saw that some people recommend placing the poster between two rag boards after spritzing the backing board with water then placing into a heat /vacuum press. I'm concerned that the pressure of the press may crease the poster. Any other suggestions?
  2. Thread Sponsor

Sponsor Wanted



  • #2
    Hail to the CHIEF shayla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    25,430

    Default

    You're wise to be concerned. I've read those comments, too, and I can only think they must be about pieces that are more 'wavy' than warped. Perhaps a wavy piece that's been kept in a tube, for example, will flatten in the way previously described. But in my experience, if it's unevenly warped, there's a high likelihood that it would come out of the press with creases in it. I know it's been a long time, but is there a possibility that these are posters the customer could replace? If they do want to use these, and if they want you to try to flatten them out, it might be a good idea to have them sign a waiver of some kind. There are people on here who'll say signing a waiver won't hold up in a court of law, but it's enough to make most people think twice and take the
    job seriously. If they are determined to have the effort made, then they should be willing to pay you for your efforts and accept whatever results you get.

    I just framed a set of four of those old Northern Girl prints from the bathroom tissue ads. They were all badly warped and couldn't be fixed. I just matted them and made enough space between the mat layers that the warpage could stay the way it was and not touch the glass. She's happy with it, and understood that trying to flatten them out would tear or crease them.
    Not all barking spiders are a bad thing as long as they bring in the bacon once a year. ~ Jeff Rodier

  • #3
    SGF Supreme Grumble Framer Rebecca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C., Canada
    Posts
    3,311

    Default

    Or you could refer them to a paper conservator. http://aic.stanford.edu/public/select.html

    Most conservators will be able to give a general estimate / prognosis from an e-mailed jpeg and general description.

    Best Wishes,

    Rebecca
    "Things are just right once you realize they're never going to be just right." www.fineartconserve.com

    Help save wildlife and their remaining habitat: donate what you can to the national wildlife federation http://www.nwf.org/

  • #4
    PFG Picture Framing God RParrish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    A2 Michigan
    Age
    47
    Posts
    7,470

    Default

    I don't recomend trying a method you haven't done before, at least not on a customers work. I've tried flattening posters/prints in a drymount press, without water, just a little heat and pressure, seems to work fine in most cases. I would not add water to any paper unless you know how its going to react first before hand.
    Much depends on the amount of cockling, if there's alot it could fold back over itself and then your making the mess worse.
    Randy Parrish CPF, Parrish Fine Framing & Art

    PPFA on Facebook Great Lakes PPFA
    Director: PPFA Board of Directors, GLPPFA President

  • #5
    SPFG Supreme Picture Framer God prospero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The Grand Duchy of Lincolnyshire
    Age
    100
    Posts
    14,822

    Default

    There are waves and there are bumps. Waves can usually be flattened by giving the piece a sauna in a vacuum press, on top of a sheet of matboard. Most of the time there is enough moisture in the board to relax the paper. Release the pressure and let it cool in the press. Bumps can be tricky. As the swollen paper has to relax 360degrees you can end up with it bunching up to form a tight halfmoon crease. Near impossible to correct afterwards.

  • #6
    True Grumbler
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    South Georgia
    Posts
    93

    Default

    I guess you would consider these bumps in the poster...the paper is 3-dimensional ...not wanting to go flat. I read a post suggesting a humidity chamber. Would that work here? If so, does anyone know the process?

    Thanks.

  • Thread Sponsor
    Sponsor Wanted

    Call (401) 619-4335 to become a sponsor today.


  • Go

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    Wizard Ad