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Thread: Glass handling gloves

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    CGF, Certified Grumble Framer cwphoto's Avatar
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    Default Glass handling gloves

    I recently picked up a pair of Ansell-801 gloves as recommended by a forum member for handling glass. I did a little more reading about these, and they are actually not listed as a cut resistant gloves at all. I think the covering is just foam nitrile, but does not have the cut resistance of Kevlar. The 801 is very slip resistant, and comfortable to me. It seems like a better suited glove would be the Ansell-501, with Kevlar, but wanted to get others feedback as to what they find works the best for comfort and dexterity.

    Thanks,

    Troy
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    SPFG Supreme Picture Framer God Jeff Rodier's Avatar
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    Stanley brand rubber dipped gloves are all you need. I know there are a ton of framers who don't clean their glass so I don't know if they will leave any smudge or not. I personally think it is insane to not clean every single piece of glass used. The 30 seconds it takes is really worth the trouble.
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    PFG Picture Framing God Artrageous's Avatar
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    I figured the gloves were used in handling the glass, not in the cleaning of it....

    Glove free since '93.
    Mark

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    PFG Picture Framing God neilframer's Avatar
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    42 years and I have never used gloves except when I handle Museum glass (just to prevent fingerprints).
    I clean every piece of glass, both sides except with Museum glass.
    On MG, I only inspect and clean as necessary, especially on the side that faces the artwork.

    Doesn't everyone have 8 fingers?
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    PFG Picture Framing God Artrageous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilframer View Post
    42 years and I have never used gloves except when I handle Museum glass (just to prevent fingerprints).
    I clean every piece of glass, both sides except with Museum glass.
    On MG, I only inspect and clean as necessary, especially on the side that faces the artwork.

    Doesn't everyone have 8 fingers?
    My glove... as inconceivable as it may seem.

    Mark

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    That's only 6 Mark.

    I personally don't like using gloves. I never feel like I can feel the glass and that makes me nervous. And yes, that includes Museum Glass.

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    PFG Picture Framing God neilframer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artrageous View Post
    My glove... as inconceivable as it may seem.

    Wow, that's what I need when I have to count to 12!
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    PFG Picture Framing God neilframer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EMcBride View Post
    That's only 6 Mark.

    I personally don't like using gloves. I never feel like I can feel the glass and that makes me nervous. And yes, that includes Museum Glass.
    My old boss used to always carry the glass with his hands on the sides.
    He went through boxes of band-aids.
    I always carry it with my hands at the top. If it slips, just let go and watch your feet.
    42 years, no stitches (so far).
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    I framed over 45 years. The only time I have ever worn gloves was while handling museum glass, the fingerprint issue. I've trained one heck of a lot of framers over the years, never once did I ever see a need for gloves. Well once, but he was not a framer.

    Anyway, I question the safety of using gloves. I wonder if perhaps they might create a false sense of security. There are a lot of other issues about using gloves regarding safety that might be of concern. Such as lifting a lite up in front of you while moving it from the cutter to your bench.

    Glass should be carried with one hand with the sheet hanging at your side, unless the sheet is too large to do that. This way, you can not bend the glass which would cause it to break while carrying, also, if you run into something, only your leg or foot would be damaged, not your torso.

    I think it you would be better served to learn to handle glass correctly, so that you do not need gloves.

    Glass is spooky stuff if you don't really understand its characteristics. I guess I can understand some folks wanting to use gloves.

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    After 47 years of framing, I'm retired.

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    CGF, Certified Grumble Framer cwphoto's Avatar
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    Perhaps I should rephrase my question. I wasn't really asking about the relative merits of using gloves for handling glass versus not using gloves for handling glass, but rather recommendations about selection of gloves for those who use them. For five dollars, the Ansell 801 provide a sure grip, and some degree of protection from cutting yourself--they are fairly comfortable too. I like em and will continue to use them. I certainly respect those who do not use gloves or have any desire to. No judgment here.

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    Use them on Museum Glass then get back to me will ya??
    Sometimes my eye-rolls are the most exercise I get all day.......

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    Back in the day I bought glass in 48x60 with 1200 square feet per case (pallet) and used at least a full case per month. It was lowered through the back door with a boom since I had no overhead door. It sat in a hall to the bathroom tipped back against the wall. Now we had to grab the sheet there and make a turn to head down a short hallway and past the 4' square v-nailer table and make another turn. Now it was 20' past an 8' square table and another turn into the room where it was cut. Another 12' and you could place it on the glass cutter.

    You better believe I know the best gloves to handle glass and those are the rubber dipped gloves. These gloves can be found at the gas station since they can be used to protect your hand from the gasoline while pumping the gas and that is always least expensive place to buy them with the price of $2.99 nationwide. The "Best" rubber dipped gloves run about $15 at the home improvement centers but you can also find others for $4 there. The less expensive ones are better since they are a stretch weave that hug the hands so the glove won't slip away from your hand.

    Many of the more expensive ones are more vinyl than rubber so they don't have the best grip and once they begin to wear a little they are slippery on glass. I buy the Stanley Tools brand because the texture is perfect and they fit every size hand from the dainty wife to a Sumo wrestler. These gloves are great for unloading trucks for the great grip and hand protection. No more spitting on your hands to get a grip on a standard box of glass being carried around the shop. Never get a splinter hauling 4' x 8' plywood or MDF.

    I almost never use gloves to handle glass now since I don't buy larger than 40x60 and have always been very strict about everyone gripping it from the top since I've seen it slide down a pair of hand in the past. A framer with stitches across the palms of both hands is absolutely worthless. The only time I use gloves to handle glass is when I have to place a 40x 60 on the glass cutter in the vertical orientation so I can grip it by the sides. My glass cutter is high enough that I have to stand on my toes to grip it by the top and set it upright on the cutter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackiris View Post
    Use them on Museum Glass then get back to me will ya??
    So you don't clean your glass.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Rodier View Post
    So you don't clean your glass.
    Not museum glass........ never ever ever.

    The cotton gloves I use..... leave no marks or smudges... on musuem glass... which I don't clean.... since there are NO smudges....
    Sometimes my eye-rolls are the most exercise I get all day.......

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    SPFG Supreme Picture Framer God Jeff Rodier's Avatar
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    What about the residue left from the kraft paper it is interleaved with. I'm not a conservationista so not worried about the harmful effects of some possible acid source but there is stuff on there that may show up in the future. Most customers have it so nasty with smudges and streaks if they ever clean it so they most likely don't notice splotches on the inside and that is why I prefer Artglass.
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    CGF, Certified Grumble Framer cwphoto's Avatar
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    Here the link that prompted me to try these gloves in the first place:

    http://thegrumble.com/showthread.php...t=gloves+glass

    Troy

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    Put me in the barehanded corner. Hold the lite by both sides near the top and to one side while walking. I have a pair of glass gloves which a glass delivery guy gave me years ago but don't like the lack of feel.

    If you want some real fun try carrying a lite one-handed while on crutches. It can be done ( but very carefully)
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    At an Asian grocery store in Denver, I found packs of "butchers gloves". They are knit cotton gloves with a red rubber coating on the palm and fingers. $5 gets you 20 pair. I use them for any glass handling as they are really quite non-slip and don't seem to transfer any residue or marks.

    I also use them to change out the blades on my chopper, and they are great when you need to carry anything heavy and need a little extra grip.

    Highly recommended, and a fraction of the price of the glass handling gloves sold by suppliers.
    Michael Georges
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    MGF Master Grumble Framer BatesMotel's Avatar
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    I have a couple sets of the plastic coated gloves for when we dump the glass can. There are always glass shards that come out the bottom.

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    After cutting glass gloveless for twenty years, we started using Ansell 11-500 gloves about eight years ago. We never had much problem handling glass before, but it's better safe than sorry.

    I would imagine one's search for the six fingered man would be in vain if he had carried glass around the shop with out gloves thus making him a five fingered man. Call me a ninny, but safe is safe.

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    SPFG Supreme Picture Framer God Bob Doyle's Avatar
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    Technically a six fingered person would have 7 appendages on that one hand. 6 fingers and a thumb....

    The search for a glass glove that would guard against slicing cuts would not protect against piercing. I used to cut my self a lot when I first started, not when handling or cutting glass but when cleaning it. When I switched to micro fiber cloths instead of using paper towels I rarely cut myself cleaning.

    When I used regular glass almost exclusively I invested in a glass seamer from United. I think it was under $10. The took the sharp edge off the glass in no time and I would recommend using that to protect your fingers over a glove that protects from slicing accidents. I don't use the seamer as much anymore as the shards tend to stick to the UV coating. I do use it for glass sold directly to artists.
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    http://thegrumble.com/showthread.php...l=1#post674402

    The vinyl gloves I mentioned in that post work great for glass, regular or museum. I like to save the free ones from True Vue for using on acrylic.

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    I had kevlar lined gloves at one stage but stopped wearing them long ago as they were not flexible enough and I felt they made it more dangerous overall as a result. I do still wear gloves for the 6'x4' sheets and larger but anything smaller not at all.
    Don't get back to basics - never leave them.

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    When handling glass, protection for your wrists is possibly more important than protecting your hands…..at least that is what I was thought about handling glass by the people who trained me, they had over 150 years’ experience of handling glass between them.

    http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/gis1.pdf

    The link id for safety in the glass industry as a whole, given the amount of glass framers handle some or all of the safety needs of the glass industry would apply.

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    MGF Master Grumble Framer Tommy P's Avatar
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    Troy

    I use the Ansell 801 gloves. Used to do it bare handed. Then graduated to the free Tru Vue cotton ones. From a thread here on the G, I then switched to the Ansell's. And this is were I will remain.

    I've looked at the ones with Kevlar for added safety but they are not as flexible. I primarily like them for the slip resistance and a bit of extra safety over bare hands.. But the added benefit is no fingerprints. I don't care how clean your hands are if you handle the glass in any other way than by the edges you will get smudges.

    My method for using them. Slip then on as I am reading my work ticket for the type and size of glazing. Go grab a lite from my vertically stored boxes. Head to the cutter if need and size as need. Lay the piece on my assembly table and clean if needed. Which I avoid doing at all costs. Especially Museum. Drop the lite into the frame. Then I remove the gloves and move on with finishing the package. Fast and easy.

    A note on these gloves. They are washable. Which I do with new ones before the first use. I do this because I feel they come with some residue from the factory. This will make them smudge free when they grip the glass. And after a little use if I feel they are starting to smudge (from me inadvertently touching something that I shouldn't) I will grab my glass cleaner while wearing them and squirt them and then towel dry. Like new again!

    I love these gloves and the security I feel they give while handling glass.

    And that's just the way I roll.
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