Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Glass handling gloves

  1. #1
    CGF, Certified Grumble Framer cwphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Age
    52
    Posts
    161

    Default Glass handling gloves

    I recently picked up a pair of Ansell-801 gloves as recommended by a forum member for handling glass. I did a little more reading about these, and they are actually not listed as a cut resistant gloves at all. I think the covering is just foam nitrile, but does not have the cut resistance of Kevlar. The 801 is very slip resistant, and comfortable to me. It seems like a better suited glove would be the Ansell-501, with Kevlar, but wanted to get others feedback as to what they find works the best for comfort and dexterity.

    Thanks,

    Troy
  2. Thread Sponsor

Sponsor Wanted



  • #2
    SPFG Supreme Picture Framer God Jeff Rodier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, S.C.
    Age
    52
    Posts
    15,238

    Default

    Stanley brand rubber dipped gloves are all you need. I know there are a ton of framers who don't clean their glass so I don't know if they will leave any smudge or not. I personally think it is insane to not clean every single piece of glass used. The 30 seconds it takes is really worth the trouble.
    Art & Frame Outlet
    204 George Bishop Pkwy
    (Across from the Hard Rock Park)
    Myrtle Beach, SC 29579
    (843) 236-4370

  • #3
    PFG Picture Framing God Artrageous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Time for a change of scenery
    Posts
    9,639

    Default

    I figured the gloves were used in handling the glass, not in the cleaning of it....

    Glove free since '93.
    Mark

  • #4
    PFG Picture Framing God neilframer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    5,090

    Default

    42 years and I have never used gloves except when I handle Museum glass (just to prevent fingerprints).
    I clean every piece of glass, both sides except with Museum glass.
    On MG, I only inspect and clean as necessary, especially on the side that faces the artwork.

    Doesn't everyone have 8 fingers?
    Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer
    http://www.spohnc.org
    "My time is a piece of wax falling on a termite, who's chokin' on the splinters"
    www.framinworks.com

  • #5
    PFG Picture Framing God Artrageous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Time for a change of scenery
    Posts
    9,639

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neilframer View Post
    42 years and I have never used gloves except when I handle Museum glass (just to prevent fingerprints).
    I clean every piece of glass, both sides except with Museum glass.
    On MG, I only inspect and clean as necessary, especially on the side that faces the artwork.

    Doesn't everyone have 8 fingers?
    My glove... as inconceivable as it may seem.

    Mark

  • #6
    SGF Supreme Grumble Framer
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Tucson, Az
    Age
    38
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    That's only 6 Mark.

    I personally don't like using gloves. I never feel like I can feel the glass and that makes me nervous. And yes, that includes Museum Glass.

  • #7
    PFG Picture Framing God neilframer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    5,090

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Artrageous View Post
    My glove... as inconceivable as it may seem.

    Wow, that's what I need when I have to count to 12!
    Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer
    http://www.spohnc.org
    "My time is a piece of wax falling on a termite, who's chokin' on the splinters"
    www.framinworks.com

  • #8
    PFG Picture Framing God neilframer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    5,090

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EMcBride View Post
    That's only 6 Mark.

    I personally don't like using gloves. I never feel like I can feel the glass and that makes me nervous. And yes, that includes Museum Glass.
    My old boss used to always carry the glass with his hands on the sides.
    He went through boxes of band-aids.
    I always carry it with my hands at the top. If it slips, just let go and watch your feet.
    42 years, no stitches (so far).
    Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer
    http://www.spohnc.org
    "My time is a piece of wax falling on a termite, who's chokin' on the splinters"
    www.framinworks.com

  • #9
    PFG Picture Framing God JRB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Age
    71
    Posts
    6,984

    Default

    I framed over 45 years. The only time I have ever worn gloves was while handling museum glass, the fingerprint issue. I've trained one heck of a lot of framers over the years, never once did I ever see a need for gloves. Well once, but he was not a framer.

    Anyway, I question the safety of using gloves. I wonder if perhaps they might create a false sense of security. There are a lot of other issues about using gloves regarding safety that might be of concern. Such as lifting a lite up in front of you while moving it from the cutter to your bench.

    Glass should be carried with one hand with the sheet hanging at your side, unless the sheet is too large to do that. This way, you can not bend the glass which would cause it to break while carrying, also, if you run into something, only your leg or foot would be damaged, not your torso.

    I think it you would be better served to learn to handle glass correctly, so that you do not need gloves.

    Glass is spooky stuff if you don't really understand its characteristics. I guess I can understand some folks wanting to use gloves.

    -John
    After 47 years of framing, I'm retired.

  • #10
    CGF, Certified Grumble Framer cwphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Alaska
    Age
    52
    Posts
    161

    Default

    Perhaps I should rephrase my question. I wasn't really asking about the relative merits of using gloves for handling glass versus not using gloves for handling glass, but rather recommendations about selection of gloves for those who use them. For five dollars, the Ansell 801 provide a sure grip, and some degree of protection from cutting yourself--they are fairly comfortable too. I like em and will continue to use them. I certainly respect those who do not use gloves or have any desire to. No judgment here.

  • Go
    Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    Wizard Ad